Thoughts, rants and musings about absolutely everything except photography. Or cats.

ARTICLE

The Olympus EP-2 is a horrible camera

A rant

in Olympus E-System , Wednesday, September 07, 2011

I’m on vacation in Sicily. It’s absolutely not a photo trip, but Sicily can be painfully photogenic at all sorts of level, so good casual opportunities do come up.

WARNING: high levels of sarcasm ahead, may offend.

It started with a week on the island of Favignana, which was good enough for the likes of Selgado, Burri, and a gaggle of other Magnum photographers, so it should be good enough for me. But ... they, very luckily for them, did not have an Olympus Pen-since-1959 EP bloody 2 “camera” with them. I am coming to loathe this all style and no content device. It is by far the worst camera I have ever used. Considered as a device to prevent photography it would rank pretty highly. But that wasn’t what it was intended to be, alledgedly.

It’s difficult to know where to start, but perhaps I’ll be slightly unfair and start with the add-on electronic viewfinder. Now, this camera is unusable without the EVF. In fact it should be returned as unfit for purpose without it, because the screen is abysmal. I loathe using a back screen as a framing tool, but on my Ricoh GRD at least it can be done, quite effectively even. On the EP2, forget about it: the screen is dim and coarse. So, EVF it is. And this EVF is rated as one of the best in the business. But guess what, it still sucks. It doesn’t pixelise, it has very low delay, it even has pretty good dynamic range. But it doesn’t have enough. Under harsh contrast there is just no way I can get a fix on the highlights and shadows. It burns or blacks out stuff which my eyes do not, making it impossible for my brain to instinctively make exposure decisions. It just gets it the way. And of course, when I apply exposure compensation, it reacts. No! Don’t do that! I know you can, but if I’m sussed enough to understand what exposure compensation means, then it really is not going to help me if you keep moving the electronic goalposts around. And that’s just for starters. I could go on for a lot of paragraphs about how an EVF screws up DoF preview as well. And then of course there’s the idiot fact that the camera has to be turned on to look through the viewfinder (this is “progress”, I believe), which is unfortunate given the gusto at which the EP2 drains its battery (very easily twice as fast as the E400 with the same battery). Of course, all this applies to any EVF camera, not just the EP2, but the scary thing is that this EVF really is - relatively - very, very good. But it ruins photography as an enjoyable experience, and that’s scary.

So, what about some specifics? Let’s start with “manual focus assist”. This zooms the center of the VF area so you can focus more easily. Well fine, provided (a) the object you want to focus on is in the middle, which if you’re slightly beyound idiot level it quite probably isn’t, and (b) you’re not interest in the object’s context. Ok, so you can turn it off, provided you can remember where the option is in the labyrinthine menu system - I’d happily swap it for the “art filter” position on the mode dial - and it is genuinely useful in Live View mode, on a tripod, when you’re moving the focus point around. It is absolutely a pain when it engages when you as little as think about glancing at the focus ring, ruining another shot. And yes you can turn it off. If you remembered to, and if you’ve got several minutes to waste in the menu system.

Ah yes, the menu system: ever since the E400, Olympus cameras have had the “super control panel” screen for direct access to shooting parameters. It’s actually pretty useful and has been widely copied, like a lot of good innovations from Olympus. I’m fairly sure the EP2 has it to, but I cannot for the life of me work out how to get at it. If it is there, and not just a figment if my immagination, it is anyway but 1 of 3 completely seperate systems for configuring the camera. One well designed one would suffice.

(ok, finally I worked it out. Press “OK” several times to cycle through the modes.)

The electronic level is very nice. It would be even nicer if it could be combined with the display of basic shooting info, like Aperture, Exposure, that sort of thing.

Then there’s more general stuff about the ergonomics and user interface. In A-mode, which is pretty much all I use, if you press the exposure compensation button, the value highlights in the display and you can change it with either the thumbwheel or the control dial. I try to avoid the control dial. If you click the button a second time, both the aperture and compensation values highlight, and now you can change the aperture with the thumbwheel and compensation with the dial. Or is it the other way around? And why, anyway? The opportunity for error is endless, especially if you have to use the control dial.
The control dial is a truly stunningly bad example of industrial design. Like many similar devices, it also functions as a 4 way pad, with the 4 buttons providing a quick entry point to things like ISO and White Balance. Useful, but not when the thing is so fiddly and sensitive that when you just had that shot lined up of Elvis climbing out of his flying saucer, you discover that you’re in 12 second self timer mode. Or something even more obscure. Even when you’re intentionally using the dial, the slightest misapplication of pressure can have you at ISO 3200 in a microsecond. Reversing out, however, would take a while longer.

Finally, because otherwise this could go on for ever, a word about the standard 14-42 lens. In order to pretend that it is small, Olympus made it collapsible. This provides yet another potential roadblock in getting the shot. And attaching a filter to it, especially a polariser, is an exercise in frustration. Turning the polariser almost always throws the focus completely off, and triggers an error message. And when you remove the filter it feels like you’re in serious danger of dismantling the lens inner barrel. Yet another ghastly Pen experience.

kodak_films

Kodak Films? Unfortunately, no ho bisogno, grazie

Ok, you can get good results out of the EP2, all being well, but for me at least it provides little enjoyment and kills spontaneity. So much that the whole point of the thing seems weak.

On a general note, in 2 weeks, some spent in very photogenic tourist spots, where everybody has a camera, I have not seen one “compact system camera”. No micro four thirds, no Sony NEX, no Samsung. Plently of Lumix and Fuji bridges, plenty of Canikon DSLRs, even a sprinkling of Olympus DSLRs, some high end compacts and of course hordes of digicams. But the world takeover by compact system cameras? I see no evidence of that on the streets.

So, what ‘s the alternative? I don’t always feel like carrying a DSLR around, even a small one, and compacts have their own compromises and lack creative control. Film seems tempting. A small SLR, maybe, but even an Olympus OM isn’t all that light. Or maybe a Voigtlander or Zeiss Ikon rangefinder ... but again, these involve compromises. Maybe somebody will make a CSC actually designed to encourage photography, but I’m not holding my breath.

But as far as the Olympus EP2 is concerned, I think I’ve had my fill. The worst, and possibly the prettiest, camera I have ever owned. And it seems I’m stuck with it.

Posted in category "Olympus E-System" on Wednesday, September 07, 2011 at 11:35 PM

Older Comments

from Project Hyakumeizan on Tue, September 13, 2011 - 8:15

F*** seems tempting: there, you said it. If it’s compactness you’re after, why not try a f*** compact camera. Some of them had quite estimable lenses - and decent sort-of matrix metering. Pentax Espios weren’t bad, or the eccentric but very usable Fujifilm Silvi. Your rant tempts me to get them all out of the cupboard. I think the Espio still has a roll of f*** in it indeed ....

from david mantripp on Tue, September 13, 2011 - 8:22

Well yes.  And of course as soon as it went ever so slightly dark, you’d have to put it away. Grass, other side, greener, etc.  I suspect my recent ill-temper on this blog is a sign of a degree of creative frustration.

Both my remaining 35mm f*** cameras (Ricoh GR1v and Canon A1) are more or less moribund and totally unreliable.  What I want is a well designed digital camera. That’s all.

from Bernard on Sun, October 09, 2011 - 7:13

Hello David,
You did write some time ago that the EP-2 was a fun camera to use… So it seems that for “serious photography”, you have discovered that it was not so fun after all. I am very interested by your point of view, since I am on the verge of buying either a micro4/3 camera or the Ricoh GXR…

from david mantripp on Sun, October 09, 2011 - 9:36

Hi Bernard,

Well, yes, it can be fun to use, but personally I find the results very frustrating. They are almost impossible to evaluate in the field, and due to the failings of the viewing options there is a unavoidable level of guesswork in the field.  For example as far as I know there’s no real way to preview depth of field.  I’ve just got back from a day in the mountains, where I took few shots, but a couple that I did were worth getting the tripod out for. Well, none of them are as sharp as they would have been from the E-3.  Maybe this is operator error, maybe it’s because the lens isn’t as good as the lenses I use on the E-3, maybe it’s because of the software correction the camera makes to make up for lens distortion. I don’t know, but it’s disappointing.

I think that the GXR is in many ways more interesting, but it is has two drawbacks. One, the zoom modules are all “digicam” level, and two, the EVF is apparently less good than the Olympus EVF-2, which, in my opinion, is just not good enough.

The E-P2 is sometimes fun to use, it does feel like a real camera, but ultimately it is very frustrating. 

I’ve no idea what the solution is!

David

from Bernard on Sun, October 09, 2011 - 10:28

Thanks for your reply.
I agree with the two drawbacks you mention for the GXR. I have compared its EVF with the Olympus one (VF-2), in two different shops unfortunately, and while not bad, it is definitely less good than the Olympus EVF: smaller image I think, more remanence, more scintillation, more difficulty to hanfle contrasts.
Another drawback for me is the absence of any telephoto option for the A12 (APS-C) modules of the GXR (I am not interested in the “digicam” ones), unless I use a 135mm lens or longer, such as a Leica 135mm, or an Olympus one (with adapter) on the M module.