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photoblogography - Just some stuff about photography

Dancing about architecture

Following on my recent posts about Flickr, and reading some of the comments generated on other blogs, I noticed a strange thing. There are quite a few erudite photography blogs out there, with excellent photography and informed, intelligent discussion - Colin Jago's photostream just to name one.

in Photography , Wednesday, January 31, 2007

Following on my recent posts about Flickr, and reading some of the comments generated on other blogs, I noticed a strange thing. There are quite a few erudite photography blogs out there, with excellent photography and informed, intelligent discussion - Colin Jago's photostream just to name one. However, the gender distribution in these circles is approximately 100% male. On the other hand, whilst this is not in any way statistically sound, I can't help noticing that on Flickr, there is an extremely strong representation of highly talented women photographers. I've mentioned a few before, but here are a few others well worth a look, all with a very different feel: Esther Hernandez, who is most definitely carving out a strong personal style; Salbjörg Rita Jónsdóttir, a media arts student who is equally at home with striking, stylised portraits as well as original takes on landscape; Agnieszka, who perhaps approximates closest to the "photoblog self-documentation" style; Yubi4, who seems to carry her camera everywhere, and produces a stream of visual consciousness. I really could go on adding to the list for hours, but what you will not find here, either in the descriptions or the comments, is any discussion of gear beyond a brief note in a profile, or an automated EXIF tag, or indeed any discussion of art or higher meaning. True, the format encourages rapid turnover, and is not really geared to thoughtful debate, but whilst the male members of Flickr do, often, try to present themselves as terribly interesting artists, the women, on the whole, just get on with it. Much of the debate between us men about both gear and art, and musings about technique and deeper meanings does seem to just go in circles (or explode into flame wars...). Why, I wonder, do we let this talking about photography take so much of our time away from us ? Why do we have this urge to verbalise so much ? Are we so insecure ? Side note: the recent Lightroom podcast by the tireless George Jardine, interviewing Maggie Taylor and Jerry Uelsmann seems to reinforce the point. Uelsmann went on and on (and on) about himself, his art, his inspiration, etc etc, whilst Taylor hardly got a word in edgeways, and when she did, she tended more to talk about more down to earth matters. They're both interesting, talented artists, but Taylor seems to be much more content to just let her work speak for itself.
 

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